Low Emission Development Strategies for Agriculture and Other Land Uses: The Case of Colombia.

By Alex De Pinto, Senior Research Fellow It is widely recognized that natural resource use in many developing countries, from crop production to deforestation, is responsible for the bulk of greenhouse gas emissions. We also know that, in many countries, the agricultural and forestry sectors can provide low-cost climate change mitigation opportunities. As countries experience economic growth and choose among the available development pathways, they are in a favorable position to adopt natural resource use technologies and production practices characterized by low GHG emissions. Rather than embedding high emissions practices in their development and intervene on emissions reduction at a later stage, they can utilize Low Emissions Development Strategies (LEDS). (New IFPRI report) The U.S. Government launched an initiative, the Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS), to support developing countries’ in their efforts to pursue long-term and transformative development. The initiative supports sustainable and climate-resilient economic growth compatibly with a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (USAID, 2011). Under the EC-LEDS initiative, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) has conducted an analysis of Colombia’s GHG emissions deriving from land use change and crop production for the period 2008 - 2030. One of the greatest challenges facing policymakers is the design of solutions to multi-dimensional problems and devising LEDS is an example of multi-objective policy making: increasing agricultural productivity and food security in a changing climatic environment while reducing GHG emissions. The purpose of our work is to help policymakers in their evaluation of trade-offs, opportunities, and repercussions of policies that that target GHG emissions reduction.

Building the scientific basis for climate-smart agriculture

Cross-post from IFPRI blog

Climate change is already putting food security at risk. Rising temperatures and extreme events, such as sudden droughts and floods, mean that it will be even harder to meet the growing demand for food, fiber and fuel, especially for poor countries with high population growth.

Unless immediate action is taken by policy-makers, the impacts on livelihoods will increase over the long-run, especially if agriculture expands onto wild-lands that now provide natural resources such as clean water and biodiversity.






New study suggests ways to get the agriculture sector climate ready

By Lini Wollenberg, CCAFS

Donor support for “climate readiness” in the forestry sector is helping countries prepare "Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) programs. A new report, “Climate readiness in smallholder agricultural systems: Lessons learned from REDD+” by Monika Zurek, Charlotte Streck, Stephanie Roe and Franziska Haupt, examines the lessons learned from REDD+ readiness processes to inform the agriculture sector.

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Project: Low Emission Development Strategies and Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use

What is the challenge? It is now widely recognized that natural resource use in many developing countries, from crop production to deforestation, is responsible for the bulk of greenhouse gas emissions. We also know that in many countries, it is the agriculture and forestry sectors—not industry or transport—that provide low-cost mitigation opportunities. As countries experience economic growth, they are in a favorable position to adopt development pathways and production practices characterized by low Green House Gas (GHG) emissions. The main goal of this project is to provide an analysis of alternative development pathways in agriculture and forestry so that countries can choose among a portfolio of development strategies that weigh emissions reductions against possible tradeoffs in terms of agricultural output and revenues.