Exploring the climate-conflict nexus in Sudan

Cross-post from PIM

There has been a growing interest in understanding the ways in which extreme weather events and resource scarcity may trigger conflict.

Vulnerability to both climatic and violent shocks varies across the globe and depends on various factors that usually make poor areas more likely to be affected. The Horn of Africa -the region in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) with the largest concentration of pastoralists- is extremely vulnerable. This part of the African continent has experienced high conflict levels and it is prone to climatic fluctuations that can have dramatic consequences on its rural population.

Project: Investigating the impact of climate extremes on future water and food security

What is the challenge? Extreme hydroclimatic events such as droughts and floods cause huge damages in South Asia and East Africa, in particular to agricultural production and rural livelihoods. Long-term climate projections suggest that more frequent and severe hydroclimatic extremes are likely to happen in the decades to come. Enhancing farmers’ coping capacity and improving agricultural and water policies is necessary to increase the resilience of rural communities towards both today’s and future hydroclimatic extremes.

Researchers get hands-on training to develop global food supply scenarios

By Evgeniya Anisimova, PIM

The IMPACT model is designed to examine alternative futures for global food supply, demand, trade, prices, and food security. IMPACT covers 56 commodities, which account for virtually all of world food production and consumption, including all cereals, soybeans, roots and tubers, meats, milk, eggs, oils, meals, vegetables, fruits, sugar and sweeteners, and other foods in a partial equilibrium framework.

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